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John E. Cook, Conspirator – Third Thursday Talk at the Connecticut State Library – Feb. 21, 2013 Thursday, February 14, 2013

Posted by kabery in CSLmade, history, Museum, updates.
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CONNECTICUT STATE LIBRARY “3rd THURSDAY OF THE MONTH”BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES 

Local historian Cynthia Goetz will present the story of John E. Cook at the State Library, Thursday, February 21, starting at noon in Memorial Hall. Cook, a stone-cutter’s son from Haddam, Connecticut became a Captain in John Brown’s army and helped light the spark that ignited the Civil War. Goetz illustrates Cook’s journey from his earliest days in Haddam, including his time spent listening to the fiery sermons of Henry Ward Beecher, through the battlefields of Bleeding Kansas, to his adventures with John Brown at Harper’s Ferry and his final escape and capture on the Underground Railroad. Goetz, who resides in the boyhood home of John E. Cook in Haddam, has done considerable research on Cook – the man whom John Brown considered a traitor to the cause, but whose tombstone describes him as a “noble patriot”.Goetz’s talk will be presented in Memorial Hall, Connecticut State Library, 231 Capitol Avenue, Hartford as part of the State Library and Museum of Connecticut History’s Third Thursday BrownBag Lunchtime speaker series. This series features a variety of speakers on various aspects of Connecticut history. All programs are free and open to the public and attendees should feel free to bring their lunch.

 
Thursday, February 21, 2013
Noon – 12:45
Connecticut State Library ~ Memorial Hall

About the State Library: The Connecticut State Library is an Executive Branch agency of the State of Connecticut. The State Library provides a variety of library, information, archival, public records, museum, and administrative services to citizens of Connecticut, as well as the employees and officials of all three branches of State government. The Connecticut State Archives and the Museum of Connecticut History are components of the State Library. Visit the State Library at www.cslib/org
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