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1938 Thanksgiving Proclamation Friday, November 22, 2013

Posted by capittsley in Archives, digital collections, history, New Resources @ CSL, updates.
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Governor Wilbur L. Cross

In 1936 Governor Wilbur L. Cross penned what is widely regarded as one of the most lyrical Thanksgiving Proclamations ever written. A former English Professor and Dean of Graduate Studies at Yale, Cross was elected as Connecticut’s 71st Governor in 1931. He served four terms and was defeated by Raymond E. Baldwin in 1938.

While the 1936 Thanksgiving Proclamation is a familiar piece today, in years past some of the other Thanksgiving Proclamations were equally well known. A Hartford Courant editor wrote in 1968 that “…the late Wilbur Lucius Cross in 1935 issued a Thanksgiving Proclamation that remains one of the classics of American prose.” His 1931 proclamation was noted for being one sentence of 176 words. He was quoted in a November 6, 1936 Hartford Courant article as having said “I wrote the proclamation in one sentence so that it would have to be quoted in full, if at all.”

It was his 1938 proclamation however that is a real treasure, as he was filmed reading it on December 9, 1938. It was the first time a Connecticut Governor had ever appeared in a sound film.

The Connecticut State Library is proud to bring you that historic film and all eight of Governor Cross’s official Thanksgiving Proclamations. The film can be viewed on our YouTube channel and the proclamations can be viewed in our Flickr collection.

On behalf of the staff and board of the Connecticut State Library, Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

Connecticut Forum on Digital Initiatives Monday, September 17, 2012

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The Connecticut State Library would like to invite you to join us for

The Connecticut Forum on Digital Initiatives
Digital Communities : The Evolving Interaction of Technology and Cultural Heritage

October 22, 2012
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The Connecticut Forum on Digital Initiatives brings together libraries, archives, museums, and cultural heritage institutions from around Connecticut and beyond to talk about the digital initiatives happening in our historic state. The Forum is a chance for the diverse voices within the cultural heritage sector to talk about ideas, projects and tools with which they are engaged.

The theme of this Forum is collaboration, and how working collaboratively can enhance a project and create communities of value. From simple collaborative collections to complex grant partnerships, by working together we can maximize our resources and create a greater impact. We will explore the impact of the Digital Humanities community on the Library, Archive and Museum community and discover new avenues of collaboration. So join us in building a better digital community that will move Connecticut forward.

Speakers from institutions including the Library of Congress, Yale University and the New York Public Library will cover issues just as diverse. Workshops will feature topics such as Digital Imaging Standards, Linked Data and Presentation Layers and speakers will look at emerging trends in digital humanities. Several successful collaborative projects underway in Connecticut will be highlighted.

Since we will be at the Legislative Office Building, we encourage you to invite your legislator (find your Legislator here) to stop by the Forum. Help raise awareness of the work that we do and the roles we play in our communities. For more ideas on how to raise awareness visit the AAM Advocacy page. We have created an informational page to help explain what we do. Add your voice today!

Presenters scheduled:

Greg Colati, Director, University Archives & Special Collections, University of Connecticut

Jack Dougherty, Associate Professor of Educational Studies, Trinity College

Chris Edwards, Digital Studio Production Manager, Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscripts Library

Michael Howser, Undergraduate Education and GIS Librarian, Homer Babbidge Library, University of Connecticut

Seth Kaufmann, Developer, CollectiveAccess

Mary Norris, Partner, Wiggin & Dana

Trevor Owens, Digital Archivist, National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program, Office of Strategic Initiatives, Library of Congress

Tom Scheinfeldt, Managing Director, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

Trevor Thornton, Senior Applications Developer, Archives, New York Public Library Labs

Kendall Wiggin, State Librarian, Connecticut State Library

We’d like to thank Connecticut Humanities for their support.

Who Should Attend:

This is not an introduction to digitization. It is strongly recommended
that attendees currently be involved in some form of digital project or
initiative.

Location:

Legislative Office Building
300 Capitol Avenue
Hartford, Connecticut
Directions http://www.cga.ct.gov/capitoltours/directions.htm

Registration:

There is no fee for registration.

Register here.

For more information contact

Christine Pittsley
Digital Collections Technician
Connecticut State Library
231 Capitol Ave.
Hartford Ct. 06106
860-757-6517
Email - Christine.Pittsley@ct.gov

Political Buttons now in Flickr Monday, April 23, 2012

Posted by capittsley in digital collections, history, Museum, updates.
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Just in time for the beginning of the political season here in Connecticut, the Museum of Connecticut History is proud to bring you the buttons of political campaigns past. This collection of nearly 1,000 Connecticut political campaign buttons were donated by Mr. James Cassidy of Greenwich and can be found on our Flickr page.

Gubernatorial campaign buttons, circa 1936

Gubernatorial campaign buttons for Wilbur L. Cross and opponent Arthur M. Brown. Cross was governor of Connecticut from 1931-1939.

Included in the collection are buttons from campaigns for Governor, Lieutenant Governor (until 1966 the Governor and Lieutenant Governor were elected separately), Treasurer, Secretary of the State, Attorney General and Comptroller. In addition there are buttons from races for U.S. Senator and Representative as well as examples of materials from local political campaigns. Winners and losers are both represented. The Museum has a sizable collection of Connecticut political memorabilia and there is some duplication in the new acquisition, but examples of buttons not previously in the collection far outnumber the duplicates. Connecticut political history is one of the Museum‘s three primary collecting areas, the others being military and industrial history. Of the three, political history is the hardest to illustrate, and artifacts such as campaign buttons, bumper stickers, lawn signs and similar materials are significant ways of linking abstract political ideas to the politicians who espouse them.

Twenty-one New Towns Added to the WPA Architectural Survey Collection Tuesday, November 29, 2011

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Connecticut Hall, Yale University, New Haven

The Connecticut State Library has just added twenty-one new towns to our online collection of historic homes from the WPA Architectural Survey, they are Naugatuck, New Britain, New Canaan, New Fairfield, New Hartford, New Haven, New London, New Milford, Newington, Newtown, Norfolk, North Branford, North Canaan, North Haven, North Stonington, Norwalk, Norwich, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Orange and Oxford.

Digitized materials include survey forms and photos from the Census of Old Buildings in Connecticut. Also known as “The WPA House Survey”, the project took place from 1934 through 1937 under the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.). The survey forms provide descriptions of nearly 5,000 buildings. Photographs were taken of most buildings and clipped to the survey forms. Some forms also include sketches of interior and/or exterior architectural details and a brief history of the building.

Ten New Towns Added To The WPA Architectural Survey Thursday, June 16, 2011

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A view of the front of a building built circa 1828 that is now owned by Wesleyan University. Fluted Corninthian columns grace the portico that leads to a massive front door. Leafy trees surround the building.

Wesleyan University building, circa 1828-1830

The Connecticut State Library has just added ten new towns to our online collection of historic homes from the WPA Architectural Survey, they are Mansfield, Marlborough, Meriden, Middlebury, Middlefield, Middletown, Milford, MonroeMontville and Morris.

Digitized materials include survey forms and photos from the Census of Old Buildings in Connecticut. Also known as “The WPA House Survey”, the project took place from 1934 through 1937 under the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.). The survey forms provide descriptions of nearly 5,000 buildings. Photographs were taken of most buildings and clipped to the survey forms. Some forms also include sketches of interior and/or exterior architectural details and a brief history of the building.

Gladys Bragdon Suffrage Interviews Notebook Available in Flickr Monday, April 18, 2011

Posted by capittsley in Archives, digital collections, genealogy, history, updates.
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The Connecticut State Library has just completed digitizing the Gladys Bragdon Suffrage Interviews Notebook, 1918, (RG 106) is now available online at our Flickr site. The notebook contains handwritten entries of interviews conducted with approximately 129 prominent men both in and outside local and state government about their position and views on giving women the right to vote. Bragdon recorded in the small black notebook the men’s names, job title or position in government, party affiliation, if they signed a petition,Gladys Bragdon Notebook, Section B, Page 01 interests, changed views, and if they supported the federal amendment. The interviews helped the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association (CWSA) and the New Haven Equal Franchise League (NHEFL) gather information about who and who did not support voting rights for women.

On June 19, 1919 the 66th United States Congress passed the suffrage amendment, also known as the Susan B. Anthony amendment, and sent it to state legislatures for ratification. Tennessee became the necessary 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution on August 18, 1920. The Connecticut General Assembly, in a special session, ratified the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution on September 14, 1920. The passage of the amendment by three-fourths of the states guaranteed women the right to vote.

The (Mrs. R.) Gladys Bragdon Record of Suffrage Interviews notebook submitted on July 1, 1918 documents Connecticut women’s push for the right to vote. Some of the more prominent men’s names in the notebook include: former Governor Simeon E. Baldwin, Walter Camp, Robert O. Eaton, former New Haven Mayor Frederick Farnsworth, former New Haven Mayor David E. Fitzgerald, John Fitzgerald, former Congressman James P. Pigott, J. Henry Roraback, Isaac M. Ullman, and former Governor Rollin S. Woodruff.

Seven New Towns Added to WPA Architectural Survey Tuesday, November 2, 2010

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The Connecticut State Library has just added seven new towns to our online collection of historic homes from the WPA Architectural Survey, they are Lebanon, Ledyard, Lisbon, Litchfield, Lyme, Madison and Manchester.

Polly Norton House, Madison, Connecticut

Digitized materials include survey forms and photos from the Census of Old Buildings in Connecticut. Also known as “The WPA House Survey”, the project took place from 1934 through 1937 under the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.). The survey forms provide descriptions of nearly 5,000 buildings. Photographs were taken of most buildings and clipped to the survey forms. Some forms also include sketches of interior and/or exterior architectural details and a brief history of the building.

New Artists Added to WPA Art Inventory Project Monday, September 27, 2010

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The Connecticut State Library has just added thirty four new artists to our online WPA Art Inventory Project.

In 1935 President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Works Projects Administration (WPA) in order to put people back to work. For the first time in the nation’s history, the federal government hired hundreds of artists and paid them an hourly wage for art that was pleasing to the eye and that could inspire faith in democracy.

Thousands  black and white photographs were taken of local WPA artwork in the 1930′s. A few years ago, with funding from the General Assembly, the Connecticut State Library made scans of many of the photographs and since then CSL staff has worked to identify each piece using the artists’ work cards, allocation cards and biographical information.

You can find the resulting artist bios with a list of all known WPA artwork at the WPA Art Inventory Project, or you can go right to the images at our WPA Art Flickr site.

If you have any questions, stories, remembrances, or recent sightings, please contact Mark Jones at mjones@cslib.org or (860) 757-6511 .


Eight New Towns Added To The WPA Architectural Survey Wednesday, June 30, 2010

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Goodwin Tavern, Hartford, Connecticut

Goodwin Tavern, Hartford, Connecticut

The Connecticut State Library has just added eight new towns to our online collection of historic homes from the WPA Architectural Survey, they are Hampton, Hartford, Hartland, Harwinton, Hebron, Kent, Killingly and Killingworth.

Digitized materials include survey forms and photos from the Census of Old Buildings in Connecticut. Also known as “The WPA House Survey”, the project took place from 1934 through 1937 under the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.). The survey forms provide descriptions of nearly 5,000 buildings. Photographs were taken of most buildings and clipped to the survey forms. Some forms also include sketches of interior and/or exterior architectural details and a brief history of the building.

Six New Towns Added To The WPA Architectural Survey Wednesday, May 26, 2010

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The Connecticut State Library has just added six new towns to our online collection of historic homes from the WPA Architectural Survey, they are Greenwich, Griswold, Groton, Guilford, Haddam and Hamden.

Governor John Winthrop house in Groton

Digitized materials include survey forms and photos from the Census of Old Buildings in Connecticut. Also known as “The WPA House Survey”, the project took place from 1934 through 1937 under the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.). The survey forms provide descriptions of nearly 5,000 buildings. Photographs were taken of most buildings and clipped to the survey forms. Some forms also include sketches of interior and/or exterior architectural details and a brief history of the building.

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