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The Horrors of Civil War Battlefield Medicine – Discussed at Museum of Connecticut History Presentation Monday, March 7, 2011

Posted by kabery in CSLmade, Museum.
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CONNECTICUT STATE LIBRARY “3rd THURSDAY OF THE MONTH”BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES

The Museum of Connecticut History hosts Civil War Medicine: Myth, Maggots, Minie Balls, Gangrene, and Glory on Thursday, March 17th from Noon to 1:00 p.m.  Educator Carolyn Ivanoff tells tales of heroes and life-saving medical practices under the horrific conditions of war, and dispels myths that Civil War surgeons were butchers. In fact, battlefield amputations saved most lives and were done with anesthesia rather than a bullet to bite! Ms. Ivanoff will present in period dress and show actual medical objects used on the battlefield.

The practice of battlefield medicine during the Civil War was arduous. Medical knowledge was limited and a new bullet introduced during the war increased shooting range, accuracy, and speed. While fighting, soldiers were likely to sustain terrible wounds and shatter bones, and while in camp, the lack of sanitation resulted in rampant disease. Despite these terrible conditions, both Federal and Confederate governments did their best to provide adequate medical care.  Join us and learn from Ms. Ivanoff about the practice of battlefield medicine in the 1860s – practices that save lives and discoveries that are still influencing modern medicine today.

About the Speaker:  Carolyn Ivanoff is an assistance principal at Shelton Intermediate School.  She is a versatile, proficient educator with twenty years of experience in a variety of settings. In 2003, Ms. Ivanoff was  named Civil War Preservation Trust’s Civil War Preservation Teacher of the Year. She develops and  presents a variety of historical programs beyond the classroom and into the community.

Thursday, March 17, 2011
Noon – 1:00
Connecticut State Library ~ Memorial Hall
231 Capitol Avenue
Hartford, Connecticut

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