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Henry Whitfield House Restoration and Landscaping Projects, 1900-1940, Available in Digital Collections Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Posted by aramsey in Archives, digital collections.
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The Connecticut State Library has recently completed digitizing a selection of items from the Henry Whitfield House records (RG024:001) which is now available in the Digital Collections at the Connecticut State Library.  The Henry Whitfield House, also known as the “Old Stone” house, was built in 1639-1640 in Guilford, Connecticut.  The house was built by Henry Whitfield a Puritan minister from Ockley, Surrey, England.  It is the oldest house still standing in Connecticut.

The state legislature, town of Guilford, and the Connecticut Society of Colonial Dames raised the necessary money to purchase the house and eight acres in 1899-1900.  The first restoration to the Henry Whitfield House occurred in 1901 under the direction of architect Norman Isham.  The second restoration to restore the house to near original condition occurred from 1930-1937 under the direction of architect J. Frederick Kelly.  The Henry Whitfield House restoration project also received federal Work Progress Administration funding in 1935 which assisted in completing the change back to the original house structure of 1639-1640.

The Henry Whitfield House Restoration and Landscaping Projects, 1900-1940, digital collection presents 274 scanned digital objects of selected primary source images and documents from the Henry Whitfield House records (RG024:001).  The collection includes photographs of the restoration and landscaping, correspondence, an edited version of J. Frederick Kelly’s journal, and other materials that document the restoration of the Henry Whitfield House from 1900 to 1940.

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